Welcome Amy Goodman (host and executive producer of Democracy Now!) and Host Kit O’Connell

Cover to The Silenced Majority

The Silenced Majority by Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

The Silenced Majority: Stories of Uprisings, Occupations, Resistance, and Hope

Like so many of you, Democracy Now! is one of my key sources of news. As I said yesterday, Amy Goodman really should need no introduction to anyone here at Firedoglake. The work of the DN! team are a shining example of journalism in a field that mostly seems to have fallen asleep.

The Silenced Majority is a collection of Goodman and Denis Moynihan’s weekly columns of the last four years, but taken together the columns become more than just a recap of the headlines of the day. The reporting on Democracy Now! never focuses on the spectacles which are dazzling the mainstream media, but instead on the real stories behind the flash. This collection, which gathers the short columns into thematic collections like “Obama’s Wars” and “Wikileaks and the Crackdown on Dissent,” functions as a quick reference to what’s really been going on in politics and on the world stage.

In his book review on My Firedoglake, Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan Explain the Past Four Years, David Swanson wrote:

How quickly we forget, or even never knew, this recent history — history that will never make it into school-approved history books. Reading this book, I was reminded of watching, for the first time, the movie Fahrenheit 911 by Michael Moore who wrote this book’s introduction. That movie recounted basic facts about recent years, many of them familiar to anyone who’d been paying attention, and yet the information came as a shock to most moviegoers. This book would come as a shock to most readers.

To regular Firedoglake readers, it may not be so much shock as deep satisfaction — the book reads like a greatest hits compilation of the issues which matter. Occupy and the Arab Spring, nuclear power, the climate crisis, capital punishment, racism, and the continued failure of the drug war all feature in the book among many other topics.

During the eviction of the original Occupy Wall Street encampment from Zuccotti Park, other journalists were content to stay confined to the tiny corral police had set aside. The authors slipped free of the police and snuck into the park where they describe a book they found in the wreckage of tents, tarps and sleeping bags:

We saw a broken bookcase in one pile. Deeper in the park, I spotted a single book on the ground. It was marked “OWLSL,” for Occupy Wall Street Library, also known as the People’s Library, one of the key institution that had sprung up in the organic democracy of the movement. By the latest count, it had accumulated 5,000 donated books. The one I found, amidst the debris of democracy that was being hauled off to the dump, was Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley.

As the night progressed, the irony of finding Huxley’s book grew. He wrote it in 1958, almost thirty years after his famous dystopian novel Brave New World. The original work described society in the future where people had been stratified into haves and have-nots. The Brave New World denizens were plied with pleasure, distraction, advertisement, and intoxicating drugs to lull them into complacency, a world of perfect consumerism, with lower classes doing all the work for an elite.

In the “Luminaries” section, The Silenced Majority highlights key figures including some I had not have considered like British spy turned spy novelist John le Carré:

His latest book (his twenty-second), just out this week, is called Our Kind of Traitor. It targets a fictional array of London bankers and their protectors in Parliament, who collude with Russian Mafiosi to prop up the collapsed world economy by laundering hundreds of billions of dollars in criminal profits.

Or blacklisted musician E.Y. “Yip” Harburg, who wrote “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” and “Brother Can You Spare a Dime?”

Harburg was deep in debt after the 1929 Wall Street crash. Gershwin suggested that Harburg write song lyrics. Before long, he wrote the song that captured the essence of the Great Depression, ‘Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” [Yip's son] said of the music industry then: ‘They only wanted love songs or escape songs, so that in 1929 you had “Happy Days Are Here Again” … There wasn’t one song that addressed the Depression, in which we were all living.’ ‘Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?’ became a national hit and remains a kind of anthem for hard times, corporate greed, and the dignity of the working people.

This column was expanded on Thanksgiving into a full-length program on Harburg.

The authors are also concerned with the state of journalism itself. Why are the stories that Democracy Now! covers so often overlooked by the mainstream media? In the introduction, Goodman and Moynihan have strong words about the state of the press:

At the heart of the Occupy Wall Street movement is the critique that wealth and opportunity are not equitably distributed, and our media system, largely controlled by corporations, contributes to that status quo. The Internet has created a seismic disruption to the balance of power in the media. … While fighting to presere a free Internet, journalists, press organizations and the public must not give up on the older legacy media institutions. Television is still how most Americans get their news. We have a public television system in the United States that is a shadow of public broadcasting abroad, forever hobbled by congressional threats to ‘zero out’ its budget.

The ‘crisis in journalism,’ which has been blamed on the Internet’s disruption of traditional advertising business models, is also traceable to the very corporate behavior that many of the Occupiers are protesting. Leveraged buyouts of media properties have left newspapers with massive debt, forcing layoffs of journalists and support staff. By stripping away the profit motive, by removing the Wall Street bankers from the picture, solid, disciplined nonprofit journalism is possible.

Amy Goodman has had many lively conversations about this book while on tour around the country. Here’s one we linked yesterday from the Baltimore Book Festival:

Firedoglake is proud to be the next stop on that tour and look forward to a lively conversation of our own below.

[I hope all the firepups will help me give Amy Goodman a very warm Firedoglake welcome. As a courtesy to our guests, please keep comments related to the various topics of the book and be respectful of dissenting opinions and each other. Off-topic comments should go to an open thread like this one. -Kit]

[As a courtesy to our guests, please keep comments to the book and be respectful of dissenting opinions. Please take other conversations to a previous thread. - bev]

105 Responses to “FDL Book Salon Welcomes Amy Goodman, The Silenced Majority: Stories of Uprisings, Occupations, Resistance, and Hope”

BevW November 27th, 2012 at 10:52 am

Amy, Welcome back to the Lake.

Kit, Thank you for Hosting today’s Special Book Salon.

BevW November 27th, 2012 at 10:53 am

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Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:00 am

Amy, it’s wonderful to have you here at the Lake! And great to have the opportunity to chat with you here.

I really enjoyed the book, both reading through and browsing from topic to topic. Can you tell us a little more about the idea of the Silenced Majority which draws all these columns together?

dakine01 November 27th, 2012 at 11:01 am

Good afternoon Amy and welcome back to FDL this afternoon. Good afternoon Kit.

Amy, I have not read the book but I know I have read some of your columns over these past few years. Which story that you cover do you think is least covered in the TradMed and which story do you think the TradMed actually covers well?

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:01 am

Hi everyone!

EdwardTeller November 27th, 2012 at 11:01 am

No time to follow this book salon – off to teach my next class soon.

Just have to say that Democracy Now has provided much information to me that no other daily news source came close to touching. Thank you Amy, Juan and crew.

Jane Hamsher November 27th, 2012 at 11:03 am

Welcome Amy, and thanks so much for hosting today Kit.

Thanks also for your great coverage of Bradley Manning, Amy. Kevin Gosztola is back in court today.

The book covers “the crackdown on dissent.” Is it your perception that this continues to get worse over time?

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:04 am

Some great questions right off the bat, and definite agreement with EdwardTeller! Democracy Now! is unbeatable.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:05 am

Just a minute – getting the iPad to behave here…

mzchief November 27th, 2012 at 11:05 am

Hey there Amy and everyone!

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:06 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 9

Take your time. It’s great to have you here.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:08 am
In response to EdwardTeller @ 6

Thanks Edward, and have a great class – many teachers use DN in the classroom. If you have anything to report on your use, email it to education@democracynow.org

November 27th, 2012 at 11:08 am

So much Big Welcome to Amy Goodman! Dear Lady.
And, big thanks to Kit. Doll.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:10 am

Thanks to Bev, Jane, Kit and the whole FDL crew for hosting this today.

PeasantParty November 27th, 2012 at 11:11 am

Welcome, Amy! Thanks so much, Kit.

Amy, how much did Occupy Wall Street move you?

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:12 am
In response to Kit OConnell @ 3

Thanks Kit. The title of the book is The Silenced Majority:

The reason we call it that is that i really do think that those who are concerned about war, climate change, inequality, the fate of the planet, are not a silent majority, but a silenced majority, silenced by the corporate media, which why we have to take it back.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:14 am

the subtitle is Stories of Uprisings, Occupations, Resistance and Hope…it has been on the NYT bestseller list for 5 weeks – which pleases us, since it them requires the NYT to publish the words in the subtitle, which are absent their reportage.

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:14 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 16

I like to think so too. Doing activist work — and work as a journalist — I feel like I’m on the right side, and the side of the people, but sometimes its hard to tell. What leads you to feel we really are in the majority?

eCAHNomics November 27th, 2012 at 11:15 am

Why did OWS not make any demands like a 1% sales tax on derivatives turnover?

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:16 am
In response to Jane Hamsher @ 7

the Bradley Manning story is an extremely important one. It will be on DN this week, so tune in. Sometime this week he is speaking in court, perhaps we will actually get to hear him speak in his own words, which is what we try to provide on DN – people speaking for themselves

hpschd November 27th, 2012 at 11:18 am

Welcome!

Thank you for your fearless journalism.
“Silenced Majority” is a compelling title.

In the 1930′s there was great involvement and organizing of labor unions. This was a major contributing factor in social changes. Organized labor had minimal involvement in the civil rights movement and labor seemed opposed to the Viet Nam protests.

Labor unions in the private sector are wasting away. Unions in the public sector are under attack.

Clearly no significant changes will happen without a major populist involvement.

So, how do we organize without labor support and with the clear opposition of major media? How to combat mis- and dis-information?

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:19 am
In response to eCAHNomics @ 19

Amy may have her own to say on this question, but I think saying OWS didn’t make any demands shows a lack of research. The Occupy National Gathering suggested many of the movements priorities.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:19 am
In response to eCAHNomics @ 19

OWS has been a very important movement, that is still evolving. People were just beginning to feel their power, then there was a very serious crackdown eviscerating the encampments.
The miltiarization of the police is a very serious problem that we should not become accustomed to.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:21 am

As my coauthor Denis Moynihan and I have traveled around the country, with DN!m on this hundred city tour, and we see what communities are dealing with,,,since 9/11 police departments buying tanks, in Seattle they were discussing whether or not police should have a drone.

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:21 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 23

The mainstream media seems like a broken record when it covers OWS — they repeat the same nugget over and over, like ‘they have no demands’ until it becomes a weird sort of truth regardless of whatever people do to the contrary. And if the media stops covering Occupy for a while, then suddenly returns they say ‘Occupy is Back!’ instead of ‘We’re back!’

Why is Occupy so hard for the mainstream media to grasp, as compared to an outlet like Democracy Now?

greenwarrior November 27th, 2012 at 11:22 am

Amy, your program is a national treasure!

What developments alarm you the most? Which ones give you the most hope?

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:23 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 24

Yes, as a police transparency activist I watched an Austin, Texas Police tank fire a flashbang into the home of a person who was off their medication, and I know our police department is asking for a drone as well (a new helicopter temporarily put them off this).

Do you think these police problems are systemic, and how can we make people realize how bad it’s gotten?

hpschd November 27th, 2012 at 11:23 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 23

The militarization of the police

You certainly experienced that at the 2008
Republican convention.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:24 am

In terms of the demands, the demands were there, on all those creative signs and slogans – most notably the concept of “the 99%” – the media first met the movement with silence, then with ridicule. “We are the 99%” is one of the most powerful concepts in history. We continue to cover OWS in its many facets…I think there are demands being made, by the many working groups that formed in the original encampment. And people are taking control of their lives, as demonstrated by Occupy Sandy Relief, too.

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:26 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 29

Occupy Sandy is a great example of the power of Occupy, and also how the media narrative breaks down! ‘Occupy is Back!’ is the mainstream journalistic story these days, but if Occupy had vanished for months and suddenly reappeared, it wouldn’t be able to mobilize the kind of numbers, networks, and resources needed to feed 11,000 meals on Thanksgiving.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:26 am
In response to Kit OConnell @ 25

The media are owned by corporations that are the 1%. They bring on a small circle of pundits who know so little about so much, attempting to explain the world to us and getting is so wrong. What is hopeful is that there is a vibrant independent media sector, with Democracy Now!, Firedoglake, and others.

mafr November 27th, 2012 at 11:27 am

I just want to say HI Amy, and Thanks.

eCAHNomics November 27th, 2012 at 11:27 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 23

Colossal failure of OWS. They allegedly org to expose criminality on Wall St, but couldn’t think of any appropriate remediation??? How much time would have it taken to think of something simple to demand, like 24 hours. Lot of time before anarchist infiltration provoked police brutality.

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:28 am

Amy, I was just watching today’s program about the horrible fire in the Bangladeshi factory making Walmart goods, and you related it to the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire. In the book, you also do a lot of reflecting on history — like your profile of Yip Harburg which I highlighted in my post above.

Can you tell me a little more about Democracy Now!’s approach to history, and how you relate it to current events in your columns and stories?

PeasantParty November 27th, 2012 at 11:29 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 29

They have brought “direct Democracy” to life for all of us to see. We must help each other and stick together because our own Government is against us as humans and citizens.

Amy,

Did the occupy groups move you to write this book, or was your interest spurred from Egypt and other places?

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:29 am

Democracy Now! is headed to Doha, Qatar next week to cover the latest summit of the UN Climate Change Summit. Our coverage will NOT be brought to you by the oil and gas industry, by the coal industry… we will not be running paid statements by BP about their supposed cleanup of the Gulf of Mexico.

eCAHNomics November 27th, 2012 at 11:29 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 31

Glad you raised the subject. I’m happy to see that you are handsomely remunerated; you deserve it. However, I could not find a list of donors to your $6.5 million annual budget. Could you tell us who they are, or provide a link? Thanks.

bluedot12 November 27th, 2012 at 11:30 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 23

I find it somewhat disturbing when I see the tens of thousands in Tahrir Sq and the NY police cleared out Liberty park over a few tents. And we thought we had a democracy.

KrisAinTX November 27th, 2012 at 11:30 am

Thank you so much for being here Amy.

What is your take on the Strike Debt and Rolling Jubilee movements that have grown out of OWS?

bluedot12 November 27th, 2012 at 11:32 am
In response to Kit OConnell @ 25

So the question on Occupy: should they have an agenda, a cause?

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:33 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 36

I’m really looking forward to the coverage of Doha. How do you plan to expand the story beyond what the figureheads will be saying at the conference?

greenwarrior November 27th, 2012 at 11:33 am

I loved seeing Eve Ensler (Vagina Monologues) on your program this morning talking about her new work “Emotional Creature”, her work with rape victims in the Congo, and the kick off of OneBillionRising. I was totally inspired by the idea of One Billion Woman around the world dancing to end the violence against women.

I’ll work to make it happen in Austin and be dancing in the streets this coming Valentine’s Day.

Will you be dancing in New York?

bluedot12 November 27th, 2012 at 11:34 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 29

I know what the 99% mean, but do you think the “man on the street” equates it to anything he can or should do anything about and if so what exactly?

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:35 am
In response to KrisAinTX @ 39

this is an expression, it is very important. Also w climate change, Occupy Sandy Relief, these are movements that build community. For those who don’t know about Rolling Jubilee, it is an effort to buy debt and forgive it, using the tools of the debt collection industry, but turning it on its head – forgiving debt, rather than harassing those with the debt.

check out democracy now!’s coverage here:
http://www.democracynow.org/2012/11/15/rolling_jubilee_buying_up_distressed_debt

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:35 am
In response to greenwarrior @ 42

Yes that was really inspiring! I am sure I know some women in Austin who’d like to take part.

bluedot12 November 27th, 2012 at 11:35 am
In response to eCAHNomics @ 33

More and more that narrative is proving true. I want to believe it will morph into something but there is nothing there.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:36 am
In response to Kit OConnell @ 45

there’s no telling where we will be. But the OneBillionRising is a very important effort. I went to see Eve’s play you mentioned, “Emotional Creature,” which is great if you can make it to NYC to see.

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 11:37 am

Amy, I’ve listened to you on BAI since you started. I am curious to learn why you think DN has been so successful and one of the shining lights around the nation? Why don’t other “alt media” have such success?

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:38 am

Amy, you take above about taking back the media, and in the intro to your book which I quoted you caution us against abandoning the traditional sources of news like television, print and radio.

I’m glad to be part of a vibrant independent media sector with Democracy Now, but what can we do to keep vitality in journalism? How can we get these stories in front of more people and take back the press?

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 11:39 am

What do you make of charges of being a *gate keeper* … a charge which I find very disturbing and destructive. Are there gate keepers or is this simply a sour grapes slam?

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:40 am

Eve also discussed the recent assassination attempt on Congolese gynecologist Doctor Denis Mukwege, founder of one of the hospitals that treats victims of rape and mutilation there. His bodyguard was killed in the assassination attempt. It is important to know what is going on in these distant parts of the world (as well as here at home). Eve is building a solidarity movement to support people on the front lines, like Dr. Mukwege.

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 11:41 am

When a person or company etc. refuses to come on for a interview or respond… do you take this for a tacit statement of *guilt*? It seems a pretty common practice to dodge the hard questions… no?

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:42 am
In response to dakine01 @ 4

What are least covered are movements…in fact, the media denigrates movements, ridicules activists. What could be more noble than dedicating your life to making the world a better place?

They do cover the effects of storms, like Superstorm Sandy. But when it comes to explaining extreme weather, which they highlight with all the latest animated graphics, they never mention the words “climate change.” Likewise, with showing the true effects of war.

greenwarrior November 27th, 2012 at 11:43 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 47

Well, maybe it IS time for another visit to New York.

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 11:44 am

Do you find the truth movement has morphed into a cult of true believers with closed minds? As the government has a habit of lying to the public putting them in the crosshairs as guilty seems a reasonable position. On the other hand I’ve seem act almost like stalkers…

What say you?

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 11:45 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 53

A presentation of the effects on climate change by waging WAR is a fertile topic and one never mentioned.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:48 am
In response to SanderO @ 52

We will do the story whether or not they come on, although we always try. On Wednesday, before Black Friday, we talked about the organizing going on. We asked Walmart to come on. then we talked about the results, on monday, with over 1,000 actions at walmarts around the US. We asked Walmart again to come on the show. They declined. Yesterday and today, we covered the factory fire in Bangladesh, where Walmart’s line of clothing is being made, where about 120 perished in a fire. Walmart did post a statement on their website, and we also invited them again to come on. But we have to cover the story. I don’t think it is an expression of guilt, but it surely adheres to a careful policy to avoid hard questions. You can be sure the walmart spokespeople will appear on the cable financial networks.

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 11:49 am

Dn appears to be an expensive operation.. everything of quality is these days… you don’t ask the public for money or accept ads. Where does the funding come from?

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 11:50 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 57

I’ve been inspired by the Mexican activists who have physically surrounded some of their mainstream media outlets in protest of the way they are beholden to the 1% political machine. Do you think there are ways we can exert that kind of pressure here?

hpschd November 27th, 2012 at 11:50 am
In response to SanderO @ 56

I have never heard of the effects of hundreds of ships (many full of oil) sunk in the north Atlantic during WW2.

The US military is the major consumer waster of oil.

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 11:50 am
In response to Amy Goodman @ 57

I have listened to every single show you have done and appreciate them all. Thank you Amy and the DN team!

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 11:52 am
In response to hpschd @ 60

The US military generates green house gases like there’s no tomorrow and they are assuring that there will be no tomorrow in many ways. But global warming has not been a charge they’ve faced as far as I can tell.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 11:53 am
In response to Kit OConnell @ 49

We have to be supportive of independent media organizations, and continue to hold the mainstream media accountable. media ownership is another issue – which the Obama administration’s FCC is now suggesting we need more consolidation, as described recently by Free Press (http://freepress.net)

Kevin Gosztola November 27th, 2012 at 11:53 am

Hey, Amy

I’m here at Fort Meade covering Bradley Manning’s court martial. We’re on recess. And I have a question for you—

There are more press here today than during any of the previous hearings this year. Somewhere between 15-20 people have shown up to get photos and do write-ups. They are here because we anticipate a sensational part of the court martial: Manning might testify about the confinement he endured.

“Democracy Now!” has covered this even when the hearings were not particularly sensational, even when it was not expected to make headlines. How important is it to cover stories in-depth, especially critical stories like this, regularly as they unfold and not only when there are sensational moments to cover?

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 11:54 am
In response to SanderO @ 58

You and Gary Null seem to to be the best fundraisers for Pacifca… does Pacifica fund DN? Excuse my ignorance

Siun November 27th, 2012 at 11:54 am

Welcome Amy and thanks Kit for the midweek dose of good conversation.

Amy, as a woman of the same generation, I’d love to hear how you keep going. We’ve known for many years that change would not happen quickly but I’m curious whether you have any tips or guidance to share about how we keep on keeping on?

hpschd November 27th, 2012 at 11:57 am
greenwarrior November 27th, 2012 at 11:58 am
In response to Kit OConnell @ 45

Let them know about the website onebillionrising.org to find out how to get involved in austin. they can just put in their zipcode to find something near them. there’s only one listing now (for a planning meeting – which i’ll attend), but i’m sure there’ll be lots more closer to valentine’s day.

i plan on letting some dance teachers know this week.

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 12:00 pm
In response to hpschd @ 67

I resent the fact that private interests control air waves which belong to no one and should not be used to make a few rich and dumb down the rest. It’s been a stellar abuse of a wonderful learning / teaching and information tool. All digital media is mostly rubbish… just like print media. No?

mzchief November 27th, 2012 at 12:00 pm
In response to Kevin Gosztola @ 64

The corporate media perform like ambulance chasers and quite lazy ones at that. I saw them on Portland livestream idling at a stop in my neighborhood, leaning out of their media truck and shouting to occupies, “What happened?,” before driving off.

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 12:01 pm
In response to Kevin Gosztola @ 64

Thanks for stopping by on a busy day, Kevin! And great question.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:02 pm
In response to Kevin Gosztola @ 64

Hi Kevin, it’s great that you are there. We hope to have you on the air in the next couple of days to see what you are reporting on.
You are right, the drumbeat coverage is what helps people understand, helps people digest a complex story.
People have to know that Bradley Manning has been kept for years, without trial (until this court martial proceeding), much of it in solitary confinement. He is being made an example of.
In response to an earlier comment on the use of history in Democracy Now!’s coverage, it is absolutely vital that we put trials like Manning’s in historical context, which is why we have repeatedly covered the Pentagon Papers story, with participants like whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg, historian Howard Zinn, and Senator Mike Gravel, all of whom were directly involved in that leak.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:04 pm
In response to Kevin Gosztola @ 64

Kevin, if you are still on recess, can you tell us your first impressions?

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 12:05 pm
In response to Amy Goodman @ 72

Wow I will really be looking forward to seeing Kevin on DN!

In another book salon we had Andy Greenberg, the author of This Machine Kills Secrets on, and his book does a great job of comparing Ellsberg and Bradley Manning!

Earlier you mentioned the attacks on the Congolese doctor helping abuse victims. It seems like that violence and the attacks on women’s rights in the United States stem from the same ugly source. What do you expect the next few months to a year to bring, post-election, for the battle for women’s reproductive health & equality?

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:05 pm

In the meantime, here is a link to the history of the Pentagon Papers from some of the participants:
http://www.democracynow.org/2007/7/2/how_the_pentagon_papers_came_to

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:08 pm
In response to Siun @ 66

My grandmother continues to be a source of inspiration. She died a few years ago at the age of 108, continued exercising, avoided medication. She endured many hardships in her life, living in three separate centuries, and persevered. I try to follow her example.

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 12:10 pm

It seems like mainstream journalism is such a mess, it’s hard to imagine trying to get started in the MSM. What would you tell a young person who is interested in becoming a traditional journalist now — not to see themselves on TV, but someone who wants to tell the important stories?

hpschd November 27th, 2012 at 12:13 pm
In response to hpschd @ 67

“The 1949 FCC Commission Report served as the foundation for the Fairness Doctrine. It established two forms of regulation on broadcasters: to provide adequate coverage of public issues, and to ensure that coverage fairly represented opposing views. The second rule required broadcasters to provide reply time to issue-oriented citizens.”

A SCOTUS argument against the Fairness Doctrine is that because there are so many sources for ‘informantion’, there is no need for such a doctrine.

In other words, because Democracy Now and FDL exist, there is no need for major media to bother with controversial matters in depth or scope.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:14 pm
In response to Kit OConnell @ 74

I see this past election as a strong repudiation against the attack on women’s rights, especially women’s control of their own healthcare. We have coverered extremists like Todd Akin and Richard Mourdock, as well as the more polished politicians like Gov. Bob McDonnell of Virginia (famous for pushing the transvaginal ultrasound on women seeking an abortion, even against doctors orders).
Another story to keep an eye on is the Virginia Attorney General, Ken Cuccinelli, who is pushing the restrictive abortion laws, and who is running for governor.
see http://www.democracynow.org/2012/10/1/onerous_requirements_under_virginias_trap_law

BevW November 27th, 2012 at 12:14 pm
Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:16 pm
In response to Kit OConnell @ 77

Get involved, become a journalist. Most young people start off with the instincts of an experienced journalists: questioning authority, especially since they have less invested in the system. They key is to get started, look at a story in your community that isn’t getting reported.

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 12:17 pm

Today you covered the thousands camping out in Tahrir square again — and even signs that Morsi is beginning to back down. Do you think the last year+, the Arab Spring & other uprisings have given activists new energy or a new toolbox to work from?

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:17 pm

Since Democracy Now! is headed to Doha, Qatar in a few days to cover the UN Climate Change conference, does anyone have any questions to ask, or issues to look at?

DWBartoo November 27th, 2012 at 12:19 pm

Late to the Book Salon, however, I got to read the comments and must rush away, now, yet I wanted to say thank you, Amy, for all that you do and have done.

Much appreciation.

DW

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:21 pm
In response to Kit OConnell @ 82

Each uprising fuels the next – from Tunisia, to Egypt, to Wisconsin, to OWS. The immigrant rights movement here in the US has been building for years, and is now forcing change. Tahrir teaches us that democracy is an evolving process. In the US, all the movements, from immigrant rights, to the environment, to womens rights and beyond, is all part of our domestic demcoracy movement.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:21 pm
In response to DWBartoo @ 84

Thanks for checking in!

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 12:22 pm
In response to Amy Goodman @ 83

The activists here in Texas are really putting their bodies on the line — facing some shocking police violence — because they believe we face a tipping point and are on the verge of irrevocably ruining this planet. It’d be interesting to know if there’s anyone influential on the inside at Doha who really takes it THAT seriously.

BevW November 27th, 2012 at 12:23 pm

As we come to the end of this great Book Salon discussion,

Amy, Thank you for stopping by the Lake and spending the afternoon with us discussing your new book.

Kit, Thank you very much for Hosting this great Book Salon.

Everyone, if you would like more information:

Amy’s website and book

Kit’s website

Thanks all, Have a great week.

If you would like to contact the FDL Book Salon: FiredoglakeBookSalon@gmail.com

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 12:23 pm

Thanks so much, Amy! This has really been a treat!

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:24 pm

By the way, for those who don’t know it, Democracy Now! is a weekday news hour with most of the sharing and reposting tools available at http://democracynow.org…airing now on over 1,100 stations around the world, 300 of them in Spanish. IF you want to help bring DN! to a station near you, check out our website and click on get involved.

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:25 pm

Thanks to everyone for participating, and for tuning in to Democracy Now! Thanks again to FDL for another great book salon!

Amy Goodman November 27th, 2012 at 12:26 pm

Check out our website at http://democracynow.org

RevBev November 27th, 2012 at 12:27 pm
In response to Amy Goodman @ 76

Congratulations…and best wishes. What an inspiration. My mother made it to 98, and Im more and more wondering how she did it. Good luck and keep working. Thanks for being here.

November 27th, 2012 at 12:27 pm

You’re awesome, Amy.
Even thanking people who don’t have the time to be here, but do check in for the Whoosh.
I’ve been lurking. Damn me for having the time to do that.
Keep on keeping on, Lady.

Kit OConnell November 27th, 2012 at 12:28 pm

Yes thanks again to Amy & Denis for this great book & for today’s conversation and to everyone who gave their input.

greenwarrior November 27th, 2012 at 12:30 pm
In response to Amy Goodman @ 83

What will it take to banish the myth of nuclear power being a green alternative to carbon emissions? How can we get nuclear closed down as a power source given it’s the biggest danger facing our planet?

pastfedup November 27th, 2012 at 12:42 pm

Welcome, Amy and thank you for all you coninue to do. DN is where I go to learn about the stories the MSM does not or will not cover.

Can’t stay am at work, but will definitely read this later, but just wanted to give you a big thanks!

john in sacramento November 27th, 2012 at 12:48 pm

Missed this, but you rawk Amy

DN is one of the key sources of the truth there is in the world. Keep on, keeping on, everybody associated with Democracy Now

pastfedup November 27th, 2012 at 12:51 pm
In response to pastfedup @ 97

Oh, and just wanted to thank you for your coverage of the Tar Sands issue and your recent interview of Henia Belalia here in SLC, a local environmental activist who is director of Peaceful Uprising. That was a good program.

SanderO November 27th, 2012 at 1:04 pm

Thank you and please answer all the questions in the future if you can.

john in sacramento November 27th, 2012 at 1:24 pm

What got me hooked on DN was the 2004 interview of Utah Phillips. I bet he’d have a lot to say about all the issues you’ve brought up in your book

I’m definitely going to have to read this one

Jane Hamsher November 27th, 2012 at 1:40 pm

Thanks so much for being here today Amy, and thanks everyone for participating.

If you’re looking for a great holiday stocking stuffer, pick up a copy of The Silenced Majority. It’s a wonderful book.

http://www.haymarketbooks.org/pb/The-Silenced-Majority

defogger November 27th, 2012 at 3:37 pm

Talk about a dynamic duo ,Amy and Jane .Beyond being great progressive voices,they are the only daily news disseminators whom I trust completely .Special thanks to Jane for her unrelenting support of OWS .

wendydavis November 27th, 2012 at 3:59 pm

Sorry to be so late, Amy, but if you ever read this thread again, I wanted to let you know that Mr. wendydavis enjoyed your talk in Mancos, CO so very much. Wish I could have been there as well.

I have no idea how you keep up with the schedules you make; simply astounding amounts of energy you can tap.

dancewater November 27th, 2012 at 4:58 pm

Also late to this thread, but wanted to say THANK YOU to Amy and her wonderful crew.

You all enrich the world.

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